310. Depression is Complex

Many people have a tendency to simplify things and put them in neat little boxes, and the more complex something is the more likely they are do so. Take depression for example. Isn’t it an emotional condition for folks who have been traumatized by some event, or can’t face up to life as it really is, or who think negative thoughts all the time? Take your pick or advance another simple explanation.

But depression is complex. There is a physiological part of it, as well as psychological and spiritual components. The brain part of the equation can be a deficiency of neurotransmitters that are not respecters of being brought up well or having a positive outlook on life. The biggest cause of depression, I believe, is stress. It can cause a brain chemical imbalance in the first place and exacerbate what heredity brings to the plate. Then there are thyroid conditions, poor nutrition, chronic diseases, brain damage, and a host of other contributors.

The psychological factors that can trigger depression are more numerous than the physiological ones: the death of a child, financial ruin, job loss, divorce, negative thinking, and other pervasive and hopeless situations that make a person ripe for depression.

The spiritual causes of depression are not so easily identified or understood by the general population. Spiritual lies implanted in young children can bring about depression later as adults. A few of these: I’m not good enough, I’m a loser, my parents never loved me, God doesn’t love me, I’m worthless, and countless others.

These three causes of depression often mix together in myriad and complex ways to sink a person into deep, deep depression. The treatment for the complexity of depression, as I have said so many times. is a psychiatrist for the body, a psychotherapist for the mind and emotions, and a spiritual counselor for the soul.

About Patrick Day

In 2010, I escaped from four long years of deep, dark depression. This blog shares lessons I learned from those years as depicted in my autobiography - How I Escaped from Depression - as well as other insights about depression and anxiety that only come from someone who has gone through it. When you have a heart attack, you become an expert in heart attacks. When you have diabetes, you become an expert in that condition. As such, I am an expert in depression, with a four-year experiential degree and graduate studies in how to live a life going forward that keeps the ever-lurking Depression at a healthy distance.
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One Response to 310. Depression is Complex

  1. Robert Farquhar says:

    I agree. My life experiences & observations bring me to similar conclusions. Your wisdom related to this subject is well expressed.

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